Coast to Coast Path Self Guided Holiday | Load off Your Back
Walk the Coast to Coast Path
A challenging walk across England in the footsteps of Alfred Wainwright
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About the Trail:

Facts: The 200 mile Coast to Coast walk from St Bees on the Cumbrian coast to Robin Hood’s Bay on the North Sea shore has attracted hikers looking for a long distance challenge with the added attraction of three national parks and some of the country’s most inspiring scenery.

Despite having become one of Britain’s most famous walks, this route remains unofficial and has only experienced some minor adjustments since being devised by author and illustrator Alfred Wainwright 40 years ago.

Highlights:The route is a delightful slice of British scenery, history and culture and it rewards those who complete it with a wonderful sense of achievement. It starts with a spectacular clifftop walk before heading inland towards Ennerdale and the first of the lakes encountered on this walk and the first mountain pass beyond. Before leaving the Lake District National Park you’ll have experienced some of the best high level hikes, lake shore walks and spectacular views England has to offer, before continuing into the Yorkshire Dales, across the North Yorkshire Moors and to the picturesque finishing point at the North Sea Coast at Robin Hood’s Bay. Take a look at the route options for walking the path for a holiday with a duration and daily walking distance to suit you.


The nature of the Trail:

The Coast to Coast path is described as ‘challenging’, particularly if undertaken in one go. Despite the presence of some fairly steep gradients, every mile is ‘walkable’ and no mountaineering or climbing skills are necessary. The topography of the eastern section is less extreme, however the Lake District’s weather can be bad and the visibility poor. The maximum ascent on this path is 773 meters (2,543 ft).

As a guided holiday: You might also be interested in walking the Coast to Coast Path in an organised group as part of our Ramblers Walking Holidays programme.

St. Bees to Kirkby Stephen - 6 Days

6 days walking
7 nights accommodation
82.5 miles /132km
From:
£485  Per Person
Single Supplement:
£20 Per Person Per Night
Solo Traveller Supplement:
£25  Per Person Per Night
Season:
spring, summer, autumn

Itinerary

Arrival - Arrival in the St Bees area
St. Bees is an attractive Cumbrian holiday village on the Irish Sea coast just south of St Bees Head, the most westerly point in Northern England, and the starting point for eastbound hikers walking the famous, but still unofficial, Coast to Coast walk devised by Alfred Wainwright in 1973. If you've time before starting your walk, apart from a stroll along the seafront and main street, you can visit the Priory Church of St. Bega relating to the medieval legend of the local saint, an Irish girl named Bega, who fled Ireland at the prospect of a forced marriage and came to live as a hermit in St Bees. There are just enough facilities and services here available to set you on your way. Why not find one of the local pubs and try the Cumbrian cuisine and local ale before the walking adventure begins?

Day 1 - St. Bees to Ennerdale Bridge (14 miles / 22½ km)
It’s time to baptise your boots in the Irish Sea and perhaps take a photograph at the ‘Mile Zero’ marker before starting your walk up to the headland and along the cliff tops. There are beautiful views across the sea towards the Isle of Man (visible on a clear day) and your first sight of the Western Fells of the Lake District. Soak up the panoramas before heading inland across farmland and through villages with an ascent up the Dent Hill towards the end of the day. Your overnight stop is at the pretty Lakeland village of Ennerdale Bridge situated on the River Ehen at the mouth of Ennerdale, one of Britain’s least developed valleys.

6¼ hours walking. Highest point (Dent Hill): 352m (1,148ft)

Day 2 - Ennerdale Bridge to Borrowdale (15 miles / 24 km)
First section of today’s walk is straightforward and easy with a walk along the southern shore of Ennerdale Water. The route continues with an ascent to Black Sail Pass and a further climb over Honister Pass before descending into Borrowdale, a settlement of three picturesque hamletsof stone-built. slate-roofed whitewashed farm cottages: Longthwaite, Rosthwaite and Stonethwaite.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Grey Knotts): 570m

Day 3 - Borrowdale to Grasmere (9 miles / 14km)
Today brings a walk through fields alongside Stonethwaite Beck before climbing towards Greenup Gill and ascending to the top of Lining Crag with fine views of Scafell Pike. We continue to the high point of the day at Greenup Edge Pass before descending and following the nicely named Easedale Beck to Grasmere village. All in all, this day is a Lakeland classic.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Greenup Edge): 616m (2,033ft)

Day 4 - Grasmere to Patterdale (8½ miles / 13½ km)
Another relatively short day, but another great day out in the Lakeland fells. Beginning on an ascending bridleway to the foot of the Great Tongue, you can choose whether to fork around it to the right or the left. The right and or eastern option has an easier gradient,with a great place to stop and take a break by a waterfall just before the paths remeet, and the path then leads you to Grisedale Tarn. Walk down the Grisedale Valley and through Glenamara Park into Patterdale.

3½ hours walking. Highest point (Hause Gap): 595m (1,964ft)

Day 5 - Patterdale to Shap (16 miles / 26 km)
Leaving the Lake District, there's a five mile ascent, passing Angle Tarn to the top of Kidsty Pike. This was the highest point on Wainwrights original route and there are great views back towards Ennerdale. Continuing east, you've the biggest descent of the whole Coast to Coast route down to the shore of Haweswater, after which it's a relatively easy and level walk to Shap.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Kidsty Pike): 784m (2,572ft)

Day 6 - Shap to Kirkby Stephen (20 miles (32 km)
A long but undulating walk across fields and grassy moorland of the Westmoreland plateau with the distraction of quiet forgotten villages and prehistoric sites along the way.

Kirkby Stephen is a pleasant market town in the Upper Eden Valley on the eastern edge of Cumbria and, as one of the (relatively) larger towns on the Coast to Coast route, a popular and welcoming base for hikers. Lying between the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, Kirkby Stephen has become an ideal stepping off point for those completing the Western Section of the Coast to Coast Path, starting the Eastern Section and for through hikers taking a break at the spiritual heart of the trail, if not the geographical half-way point.

7 hours walking. Highest point (Smardale Fell): 344m (1,135ft)

Departure - Departure from Kirkby Stephen after breakfast
Your holiday arrangements end after breakfast.

Notes

Please be aware that slight variations to these itineraries may have to be made due to availability of accommodation. Please note that the quoted daily mileage does not include distance from the path to your overnight accommodation.

Our prices are based on two persons sharing a room. If you are travelling with others and require your own room, the single price applies.

If you are walking the route by yourself, the Solo Traveller price applies If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

Kirkby Stephen to Robin Hood's Bay - 7 Days

7 days walking
8 nights accommodation
108 miles /174km
From:
£505  Per Person
Single Supplement:
£20 Per Person Per Night
Solo Traveller Supplement:
£22  Per Person Per Night
Season:
spring, summer, autumn

Itinerary

Arrival - Arrival and overnight stay in Kirkby Stephen area
Kirkby Stephen is a pleasant market town in the Upper Eden Valley on the eastern edge of Cumbria and, as one of the (relatively) larger towns on the Coast to Coast route, a popular and welcoming base for hikers. Lying between the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, Kirkby Stephen has become an ideal stepping off point for those completing the Western Section of the Coast to Coast Path, starting the Eastern Section and for through hikers taking a break at the spiritual heart of the trail, if not the geographical half-way point.

Day 1 - Kirkby Stephen to Keld (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving Cumbria into Yorkshire, we enter a landscape of peat moorlands and cross the Pennines, the backbone of England. Beyond Nine Standards Rigg, the watershed of the trail beyond which all waters drain into the North Sea rather than the Irish Sea, you've a choice of three routes over the boggy moors - if in doubt take the green route, it's shorter and involves some road walking which may be easier underfoot in poor weather.

6-8 hours walking. Highest point (Nine Standards Rigg): 662m (2,172ft)

Day 2 - Keld to Reeth (11 miles / 18 km)
A choice of a higher or lower level route today - it's the high-level route which is described in Wainwright's original guidebook. The route takes in moorland and evidence of the region's lead mining heritage passing intriguingly named places such as Surrender Bridge and Cringley Bottom.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Swinner Gill): 560m (1,837ft)

Day 3 - Reeth to Richmond (11 miles / 18 km)
A walk along the River Swale before heading uphill towards Marrick with a view of the ruined priory. There's descending and undulating terrain to the village of Marske before finally contouring under Applegarth Scar, through the tranquillity of Whitecliffe Wood before joining the road down to Richmond, a busy market town and the largest town on the path, centred around an attractive cobbled marketplace - one of the largest in England.

4½ hours walking. Highest point (Marrick): 320m (1,050ft)

Day 4 - Richmond to Ingleby Cross (23 miles / 37 km)
Leaving he Yorkshire Dales National Park behind, there's hardly a hill in sight today as you cross the Vale of Mowbray. The day starts off following the River Swale and traverses flat farmland at the foot of the North Yorkshire Moors and just within the boundary of the national park.

8½ hours walking. Highest point (Richmond): 137m (450ft)

Day 5 - Ingleby Cross to Clay Bank Top (12 miles / 19 km)
A day of roller-coaster ridge walking with eight or nine pairs of ascents and descents along the northern rim of the North York Moors on good paths all day. The route also includes a section of the Cleveland Way. You're rewarded on all the tops with good views towards the Cleveland Hills and your first sight of the North Sea.

7 hours walking. Highest point (Broughton Plantation): 420m (1,380ft)

Day 6 - Clay Bank Top to Glaisdale (19 miles / 30½ km)
The day begins with a short ascent to the top of Urra Moor and soon picks up the path of a former railway line towards Blakey Ridge. Descending the moor towards the North Sea you pass the stumpy Fat Betty landmark, join Great Fryup Lane (nicely derived the name of a Norse Goddess, 'Freya' and the old English word 'hop' meaning remote valley) from the and pass Trough House, leaving the moor behind and reach Glaisdale, perched above the Esk Valley.

8 hours walking. Highest point (Urra Moor): 445m (1,500ft)

Day 7 - Glaisdale to Robin Hood's Bay (19 miles / 30½ km)
After a walk through East Arncliff Wood, you'll descent to the village of Egton Bridge, one of the prettiest on the Coast to Coast route, before continuing down the valley past the elegant Egton Manor into the one-street village of Grosmont. After the easy descents earlier in the day, there's a 15 mile stretch of ups and downs leading to the sea beginning with a 230m climb out of Grosmont to the top of Sleights Moor. You'll reach the North Sea just beyond High Hawkser and rejoin the Cleveland Way along the clifftops as you head into picturesque Robin Hood's Bay.

8 hours walking. Highest point (Slights Moor): 297m (974ft)

Departure - Departure from Robin Hood's Bay after breakfast
Your holiday arrangements end after breakfast.

Notes

Please be aware that slight variations to these itineraries may have to be made due to availability of accommodation. Please note that the quoted daily mileage does not include distance from the path to your overnight accommodation.

Our prices are based on two persons sharing a room. If you are travelling with others and require your own room, the single price applies.

If you are walking the route by yourself, the Solo Traveller price applies If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

St Bees to Robin Hood's Bay - 14 Days

14 days walking
15 nights accommodation
191 miles /307km
From:
£895  Per Person
Single Supplement:
£20 Per Person Per Night
Solo Traveller Supplement:
£22  Per Person Per Night
Season:
spring, summer, autumn

Itinerary

Arrival - Arrival and overnight stay in St. Bees area
St. Bees is an attractive Cumbrian holiday village on the Irish Sea coast just south of St Bees Head, the most westerly point in Northern England, and the starting point for eastbound hikers walking the famous, but still unofficial, Coast to Coast walk devised by Alfred Wainwright in 1973. If you've time before starting your walk, apart from a stroll along the seafront and main street, you can visit the Priory Church of St. Bega relating to the medieval legend of the local saint, an Irish girl named Bega, who fled Ireland at the prospect of a forced marriage and came to live as a hermit in St Bees. There are just enough facilities and services here available to set you on your way. Why not find one of the local pubs and try the Cumbrian cuisine and local ale before the walking adventure begins?

Day 1 - St. Bees to Ennerdale Bridge (14 miles / 22½ km)
It’s time to baptise your boots in the Irish Sea, pick up a pebble from the beach and perhaps take a photograph at the ‘Mile Zero’ marker before starting your walk up to the headland and along the cliff tops. There are beautiful views across the sea towards the Isle of Man (visible on a clear day) and your first sight of the Western Fells of the Lake District. Soak up the panoramas before heading inland across farmland and through villages with an ascent up the Dent Hill towards the end of the day. Your overnight stop is at the pretty Lakeland village of Ennerdale Bridge situated on the River Ehen at the mouth of Ennerdale, one of Britain’s least developed valleys.

6¼ hours walking. Highest point (Dent Hill): 352m (1,148ft)

Day 2 - Ennerdale Bridge to Borrowdale (15 miles / 24 km)
First section of today’s walk is straightforward and easy with a walk along the southern shore of Ennerdale Water. The route continues with an ascent to Black Sail Pass and a further climb over Honister Pass before descending into Borrowdale, a settlement of three picturesque hamletsof stone-built. slate-roofed whitewashed farm cottages: Longthwaite, Rosthwaite and Stonethwaite.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Grey Knotts): 570m

Day 3 - Borrowdale to Grasmere (9 miles / 14km)
Today brings a walk through fields alongside Stonethwaite Beck before climbing towards Greenup Gill and ascending to the top of Lining Crag with fine views of Scafell Pike. We continue to the high point of the day at Greenup Edge Pass before descending and following the nicely named Easedale Beck to Grasmere village. All in all, this day is a Lakeland classic.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Greenup Edge): 616m (2,033ft)

Day 4 - Grasmere to Patterdale (8½ miles / 13½ km)
Another relatively short day, but another great day out in the Lakeland fells. Beginning on an ascending bridleway to the foot of the Great Tongue, you can choose whether to fork around it to the right or the left. The right and or eastern option has an easier gradient,with a great place to stop and take a break by a waterfall just before the paths remeet, and the path then leads you to Grisedale Tarn. Walk down the Grisedale Valley and through Glenamara Park into Patterdale.

3½ hours walking. Highest point (Hause Gap): 595m (1,964ft)

Day 5 - Patterdale to Shap (16 miles / 26 km)
Leaving the Lake District, there's a five mile ascent, passing Angle Tarn to the top of Kidsty Pike. This was the highest point on Wainwrights original route and there are great views back towards Ennerdale. Continuing east, you've the biggest descent of the whole Coast to Coast route down to the shore of Haweswater, after which it's a relatively easy and level walk to Shap.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Kidsty Pike): 784m (2,572ft)

Day 6 - Shap to Kirkby Stephen (20 miles (32 km)
A long but undulating walk across fields and grassy moorland of the Westmoreland plateau with the distraction of quiet forgotten villages and prehistoric sites along the way.

Kirkby Stephen is a pleasant market town in the Upper Eden Valley on the eastern edge of Cumbria and, as one of the (relatively) larger towns on the Coast to Coast route, a popular and welcoming base for hikers. Lying between the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, Kirkby Stephen has become an ideal stepping off point for those completing the Western Section of the Coast to Coast Path, starting the Eastern Section and for through hikers taking a break at the spiritual heart of the trail, if not the geographical half-way point.

7 hours walking. Highest point (Smardale Fell): 344m (1,135ft)

Day 7 - Kirkby Stephen to Keld (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving Cumbria into Yorkshire, we enter a landscape of peat moorlands and cross the Pennines, the backbone of England. Beyond Nine Standards Rigg, the watershed of the trail beyond which all waters drain into the North Sea rather than the Irish Sea, you've a choice of three routes over the boggy moors - if in doubt take the green route, it's shorter and involves some road walking which may be easier underfoot in poor weather.

6-8 hours walking. Highest point (Nine Standards Rigg): 662m (2,172ft)

Day 8 - Keld to Reeth (11 miles / 18 km)
A choice of a higher or lower level route today - it's the high-level route which is described in Wainwright's original guidebook. The route takes in moorland and evidence of the region's lead mining heritage passing intriguingly named places such as Surrender Bridge and Cringley Bottom.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Swinner Gill): 560m (1,837ft)

Day 9 - Reeth to Richmond (11 miles / 18 km)
A walk along the River Swale before heading uphill towards Marrick with a view of the ruined priory. There's descending and undulating terrain to the village of Marske before finally contouring under Applegarth Scar, through the tranquillity of Whitecliffe Wood before joining the road down to Richmond, a busy market town and the largest town on the path, centred around an attractive cobbled marketplace - one of the largest in England.

4½ hours walking. Highest point (Marrick): 320m (1,050ft)

Day 10 - Richmond to Ingleby Cross (23 miles / 37 km)
Leaving he Yorkshire Dales National Park behind, there's hardly a hill in sight today as you cross the Vale of Mobray. The day starts off following the River Swale and traverses flat farmland at the foot of the North Yorkshire Moors and just within the boundary of the national park.

8½ hours walking. Highest point (Richmond): 137m (450ft)

Day 11 - Ingleby Cross to Clay Bank Top (12 miles / 19 km)
A day of roller-coaster ridge walking with eight or nine pairs of ascents and descents along the northern rim of the North York Moors on good paths all day. The route also includes a section of the Cleveland Way. You're rewarded on all the tops with good views towards the Cleveland Hills and your first sight of the North Sea.

7½ hours walking. Highest point (Broughton Plantation): 420m (1,380ft)

Day 12 - Clay Bank Top to Blakey Ridge (9½ miles / 15½ km)
The day begins with a short ascent to the top of Urra Moor and soon picks up the path of a former railway line towards Blakey Ridge.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Urra Moor): 445m (1,500ft)

Day 13 - Blakey Ridge to Glaisdale (10 miles / 16km)
Descending the moor from Blakey Ridge towards the North Sea you pass the stumpy 'Fat Betty' landmark, join Great Fryup Lane (nicely derived the name of a Norse Goddess, 'Freya' and the old English word 'hop' meaning remote valley) from the and pass Trough House, leaving the moor behind and reach Glaisdale, perched above the Esk Valley.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Glaisdale High Moor): 400m (1,330ft)

Day 14 - Glaisdale to Robin Hood's Bay (19 miles / 30½ km)
After a walk through East Arncliff Wood, you'll descent to the village of Egton Bridge, one of the prettiest on the Coast to Coast route, before continuing down the valley past the elegant Egton Manor into the one-street village of Grosmont. After the easy descents earlier in the day, there's a 15 mile stretch of ups and downs leading to the sea beginning with a 230m climb out of Grosmont to the top of Sleights Moor. You'll reach the North Sea just beyond High Hawkser and rejoin the Cleveland Way along the clifftops as you head into picturesque Robin Hood's Bay. If you've been carrying a pebble from St Bees, it's time to leave it on the opposite shore.

8 hours walking. Highest point (Slights Moor): 297m (974ft)

Departure - Departure from Robin Hood's Bay after breakfast
Your holiday arrangements end after breakfast.

Notes

Please be aware that slight variations to these itineraries may have to be made due to availability of accommodation. Please note that the quoted daily mileage does not include distance from the path to your overnight accommodation.

Our prices are based on two persons sharing a room. If you are travelling with others and require your own room, the single price applies.

If you are walking the route by yourself, the Solo Traveller price applies If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

St Bees to Robin Hood's Bay - 15 Days

15 days walking
16 nights accommodation
191.5 miles /308.5km
From:
£975  Per Person
Single Supplement:
£20 Per Person Per Night
Solo Traveller Supplement:
£22  Per Person Per Night
Season:
spring, summer, autumn

Itinerary

Arrival - Arrival and overnight stay in St. Bees area
St. Bees is an attractive Cumbrian holiday village on the Irish Sea coast just south of St Bees Head, the most westerly point in Northern England, and the starting point for eastbound hikers walking the famous, but still unofficial, Coast to Coast walk devised by Alfred Wainwright in 1973. If you've time before starting your walk, apart from a stroll along the seafront and main street, you can visit the Priory Church of St. Bega relating to the medieval legend of the local saint, an Irish girl named Bega, who fled Ireland at the prospect of a forced marriage and came to live as a hermit in St Bees. There are just enough facilities and services here available to set you on your way. Why not find one of the local pubs and try the Cumbrian cuisine and local ale before the walking adventure begins?

Day 1 - St. Bees to Ennerdale Bridge (14 miles / 22½ km)
It’s time to baptise your boots in the Irish Sea, pick up a pebble from the beach and perhaps take a photograph at the ‘Mile Zero’ marker before starting your walk up to the headland and along the cliff tops. There are beautiful views across the sea towards the Isle of Man (visible on a clear day) and your first sight of the Western Fells of the Lake District. Soak up the panoramas before heading inland across farmland and through villages with an ascent up the Dent Hill towards the end of the day. Your overnight stop is at the pretty Lakeland village of Ennerdale Bridge situated on the River Ehen at the mouth of Ennerdale, one of Britain’s least developed valleys.

6¼ hours walking. Highest point (Dent Hill): 352m (1,148ft)

Day 2 - Ennerdale Bridge to Borrowdale (15 miles / 24 km)
First section of today’s walk is straightforward and easy with a walk along the southern shore of Ennerdale Water. The route continues with an ascent to Black Sail Pass and a further climb over Honister Pass before descending into Borrowdale, a settlement of three picturesque hamletsof stone-built. slate-roofed whitewashed farm cottages: Longthwaite, Rosthwaite and Stonethwaite.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Grey Knotts): 570m

Day 3 - Borrowdale to Grasmere (9 miles / 14km)
Today brings a walk through fields alongside Stonethwaite Beck before climbing towards Greenup Gill and ascending to the top of Lining Crag with fine views of Scafell Pike. We continue to the high point of the day at Greenup Edge Pass before descending and following the nicely named Easedale Beck to Grasmere village. All in all, this day is a Lakeland classic.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Greenup Edge): 616m (2,033ft)

Day 4 - Grasmere to Patterdale (8½ miles / 13½ km)
Another relatively short day, but another great day out in the Lakeland fells. Beginning on an ascending bridleway to the foot of the Great Tongue, you can choose whether to fork around it to the right or the left. The right and or eastern option has an easier gradient,with a great place to stop and take a break by a waterfall just before the paths remeet, and the path then leads you to Grisedale Tarn. Walk down the Grisedale Valley and through Glenamara Park into Patterdale.

3½ hours walking. Highest point (Hause Gap): 595m (1,964ft)

Day 5 - Patterdale to Bampton (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving the Lake District, there's a five mile ascent, passing Angle Tarn to the top of Kidsty Pike. This was the highest point on Wainwrights original route and there are great views back towards Ennerdale. Continuing east, you've the biggest descent of the whole Coast to Coast route down to the shore of Haweswater, after which it's a short relatively easy and level walk to Bampton, just off the path a couple of miles beyond the Hawswater dam.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Kidsty Pike): 784m (2,572ft)

Day 6 - Bampton to Orton (11 miles / 18 km)
Five miles of undulating grassy fields leads to the ruins of Shap Abbey before passing through Shap, crossing over the transport arteries of the West Coast Main Line and M6, pass Robin Hood's Grave and on to the village of Orton.

5 hours walking. Highest point: 355m (1,170ft)

Day 7 - Orton to Kirkby Stephen (13 miles / 21 km)
An undulating walk across fields and grassy moorland of the Westmoreland plateau with the distraction of quiet forgotten villages and prehistoric sites along the way. Kirkby Stephen is a pleasant market town in the Upper Eden Valley on the eastern edge of Cumbria and, as one of the (relatively) larger towns on the Coast to Coast route, a popular and welcoming base for hikers.

5½ hours walking. Highest point (Smardale Fell): 344m (1,135ft)

Day 8 - Kirkby Stephen to Keld (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving Cumbria into Yorkshire, we enter a landscape of peat moorlands and cross the Pennines, the backbone of England. Beyond Nine Standards Rigg, the watershed of the trail beyond which all waters drain into the North Sea rather than the Irish Sea, you've a choice of three routes over the boggy moors - if in doubt take the green route, it's shorter and involves some road walking which may be easier underfoot in poor weather.

6-8 hours walking. Highest point (Nine Standards Rigg): 662m (2,172ft)

Day 9 - Keld to Reeth (11 miles / 18 km)
A choice of a higher or lower level route today - it's the high-level route which is described in Wainwright's original guidebook. The route takes in moorland and evidence of the region's lead mining heritage passing intriguingly named places such as Surrender Bridge and Cringley Bottom.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Swinner Gill): 560m (1,837ft)

Day 10 - Reeth to Richmond (11 miles / 18 km)
A walk along the River Swale before heading uphill towards Marrick with a view of the ruined priory. There's descending and undulating terrain to the village of Marske before finally contouring under Applegarth Scar, through the tranquillity of Whitecliffe Wood before joining the road down to Richmond, a busy market town and the largest town on the path, centred around an attractive cobbled marketplace - one of the largest in England.

4½ hours walking. Highest point (Marrick): 320m (1,050ft)

Day 11 - Richmond to Danby Wiske (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving he Yorkshire Dales National Park behind, the day starts off following the River Swale with hardly a hill in sight today as you start across the Vale of Mowbray.

6 hours walking. Highest point (Richmond): 137m (450ft)

Day 12 - Danby Wiske to Ingleby Cross (10 miles /16 km)
Continuing across the Vale of Mowbray the day ends at the foot of the North Yorkshire Moors and just within the boundary of the national park.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Ingleby Cross): 72m (238ft)

Day 13 - Ingleby Cross to Blakey Ridge (21 miles / 34 km)
The first 15 miles are a ridge walking roller-coaster with eight or nine pairs of ascents and descents along the northern rim of the North York Moors before a relatively level last few miles to Blakey Ridge. The route also includes a section of the Cleveland Way. You're on on good paths all day and are rewarded on all the tops with good views towards the Cleveland Hills and your first sight of the North Sea.

8 hours walking. Highest point (Urra Moor): 445m (1,500ft)

Day 14 - Blakey Ridge to Glaisdale (10 miles / 16 km)
Descending the moor from Blakey Ridge towards the North Sea you pass the stumpy 'Fat Betty' landmark, join Great Fryup Lane (nicely derived the name of a Norse Goddess, 'Freya' and the old English word 'hop' meaning remote valley) from the and pass Trough House, leaving the moor behind and reach Glaisdale, perched above the Esk Valley.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Glaisdale High Moor): 400m (1,330ft)

Day 15 - Glaisdale to Robin Hood's Bay (19 miles / 30½ km)
After a walk through East Arncliff Wood, you'll descent to the village of Egton Bridge, one of the prettiest on the Coast to Coast route, before continuing down the valley past the elegant Egton Manor into the one-street village of Grosmont. After the easy descents earlier in the day, there's a 15 mile stretch of ups and downs leading to the sea beginning with a 230m climb out of Grosmont to the top of Sleights Moor. You'll reach the North Sea just beyond High Hawkser and rejoin the Cleveland Way along the clifftops as you head into picturesque Robin Hood's Bay. If you've been carrying a pebble from St Bees, it's time to leave it on the opposite shore.

8 hours walking. Highest point (Slights Moor): 297m (974ft)

Departure - Departure from Robin Hood's Bay after breakfast
Your holiday arrangements end after breakfast.

Notes

Please be aware that slight variations to these itineraries may have to be made due to availability of accommodation. Please note that the quoted daily mileage does not include distance from the path to your overnight accommodation.

Our prices are based on two persons sharing a room. If you are travelling with others and require your own room, the single price applies.

If you are walking the route by yourself, the Solo Traveller price applies If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

St Bees to Robin Hood's Bay - 17 Days

17 days walking
18 nights accommodation
192 miles /309,5km
From:
£1095  Per Person
Single Supplement:
£20 Per Person Per Night
Solo Traveller Supplement:
£22  Per Person Per Night
Season:
spring, summer, autumn

Itinerary

Arrival - Arrival and overnight stay in St. Bees area
St. Bees is an attractive Cumbrian holiday village on the Irish Sea coast just south of St Bees Head, the most westerly point in Northern England, and the starting point for eastbound hikers walking the famous, but still unofficial, Coast to Coast walk devised by Alfred Wainwright in 1973. If you've time before starting your walk, apart from a stroll along the seafront and main street, you can visit the Priory Church of St. Bega relating to the medieval legend of the local saint, an Irish girl named Bega, who fled Ireland at the prospect of a forced marriage and came to live as a hermit in St Bees. There are just enough facilities and services here available to set you on your way. Why not find one of the local pubs and try the Cumbrian cuisine and local ale before the walking adventure begins?

Day 1 - St. Bees to Ennerdale Bridge (14 miles / 22½ km)
It’s time to baptise your boots in the Irish Sea, pick up a pebble from the beach and perhaps take a photograph at the ‘Mile Zero’ marker before starting your walk up to the headland and along the cliff tops. There are beautiful views across the sea towards the Isle of Man (visible on a clear day) and your first sight of the Western Fells of the Lake District. Soak up the panoramas before heading inland across farmland and through villages with an ascent up the Dent Hill towards the end of the day. Your overnight stop is at the pretty Lakeland village of Ennerdale Bridge situated on the River Ehen at the mouth of Ennerdale, one of Britain’s least developed valleys.

6¼ hours walking. Highest point (Dent Hill): 352m (1,148ft)

Day 2 - Ennerdale Bridge to Borrowdale (15 miles / 24 km)
First section of today’s walk is straightforward and easy with a walk along the southern shore of Ennerdale Water. The route continues with an ascent to Black Sail Pass and a further climb over Honister Pass before descending into Borrowdale, a settlement of three picturesque hamletsof stone-built. slate-roofed whitewashed farm cottages: Longthwaite, Rosthwaite and Stonethwaite.

6½ hours walking. Highest point (Grey Knotts): 570m

Day 3 - Borrowdale to Grasmere (9 miles / 14km)
Today brings a walk through fields alongside Stonethwaite Beck before climbing towards Greenup Gill and ascending to the top of Lining Crag with fine views of Scafell Pike. We continue to the high point of the day at Greenup Edge Pass before descending and following the nicely named Easedale Beck to Grasmere village. All in all, this day is a Lakeland classic.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Greenup Edge): 616m (2,033ft)

Day 4 - Grasmere to Patterdale (8½ miles / 13½ km)
Another relatively short day, but another great day out in the Lakeland fells. Beginning on an ascending bridleway to the foot of the Great Tongue, you can choose whether to fork around it to the right or the left. The right and or eastern option has an easier gradient,with a great place to stop and take a break by a waterfall just before the paths remeet, and the path then leads you to Grisedale Tarn. Walk down the Grisedale Valley and through Glenamara Park into Patterdale.

3½ hours walking. Highest point (Hause Gap): 595m (1,964ft)

Day 5 - Patterdale to Bampton (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving the Lake District, there's a five mile ascent, passing Angle Tarn to the top of Kidsty Pike. This was the highest point on Wainwrights original route and there are great views back towards Ennerdale. Continuing east, you've the biggest descent of the whole Coast to Coast route down to the shore of Haweswater, after which it's a short relatively easy and level walk to Bampton, just off the path a couple of miles beyond the Hawswater dam.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Kidsty Pike): 784m (2,572ft)

Day 6 - Bampton to Orton (11 miles / 18 km)
Five miles of undulating grassy fields leads to the ruins of Shap Abbey before passing through Shap, crossing over the transport arteries of the West Coast Main Line and M6, pass Robin Hood's Grave and on to the village of Orton.

5 hours walking. Highest point: 355m (1,170ft)

Day 7 - Orton to Kirkby Stephen (13 miles / 21 km)
An undulating walk across fields and grassy moorland of the Westmoreland plateau with the distraction of quiet forgotten villages and prehistoric sites along the way. Kirkby Stephen is a pleasant market town in the Upper Eden Valley on the eastern edge of Cumbria and, as one of the (relatively) larger towns on the Coast to Coast route, a popular and welcoming base for hikers.

5½ hours walking. Highest point (Smardale Fell): 344m (1,135ft)

Day 8 - Kirkby Stephen to Keld (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving Cumbria into Yorkshire, we enter a landscape of peat moorlands and cross the Pennines, the backbone of England. Beyond Nine Standards Rigg, the watershed of the trail beyond which all waters drain into the North Sea rather than the Irish Sea, you've a choice of three routes over the boggy moors - if in doubt take the green route, it's shorter and involves some road walking which may be easier underfoot in poor weather.

6-8 hours walking. Highest point (Nine Standards Rigg): 662m (2,172ft)

Day 9 - Keld to Reeth (11 miles / 18 km)
A choice of a higher or lower level route today - it's the high-level route which is described in Wainwright's original guidebook. The route takes in moorland and evidence of the region's lead mining heritage passing intriguingly named places such as Surrender Bridge and Cringley Bottom.

5 hours walking. Highest point (Swinner Gill): 560m (1,837ft)

Day 10 - Reeth to Richmond (11 miles / 18 km)
A walk along the River Swale before heading uphill towards Marrick with a view of the ruined priory. There's descending and undulating terrain to the village of Marske before finally contouring under Applegarth Scar, through the tranquillity of Whitecliffe Wood before joining the road down to Richmond, a busy market town and the largest town on the path, centred around an attractive cobbled marketplace - one of the largest in England.

4½ hours walking. Highest point (Marrick): 320m (1,050ft)

Day 11 - Richmond to Danby Wiske (13 miles / 21 km)
Leaving he Yorkshire Dales National Park behind, the day starts off following the River Swale with hardly a hill in sight today as you start across the Vale of Mowbray.

6 hours walking. Highest point (Richmond): 137m (450ft)

Day 12 - Danby Wiske to Ingleby Cross (10 miles /16 km)
Continuing across the Vale of Mowbray the day ends at the foot of the North Yorkshire Moors and just within the boundary of the national park.

3½ hours walking. Highest point (Ingleby Cross): 72m (238ft)

Day 13 - Ingleby Cross to Clay Bank Top (12 miles / 19 km)
A day of roller-coaster ridge walking with eight or nine pairs of ascents and descents along the northern rim of the North York Moors on good paths all day. The route also includes a section of the Cleveland Way. You're rewarded on all the tops with good views towards the Cleveland Hills and your first sight of the North Sea.

7½ hours walking. Highest point (Broughton Plantation): 420m (1,380ft)

Day 14 - Clay Bank Top to Blakey Ridge (9½ miles / 15½ km)
The day begins with a short ascent to the top of Urra Moor and soon picks up the path of a former railway line towards Blakey Ridge.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Urra Moor): 445m (1,500ft)

Day 15 - Blakey Ridge to Glaisdale (10 miles / 16km)
Descending the moor from Blakey Ridge towards the North Sea you pass the stumpy 'Fat Betty' landmark, join Great Fryup Lane (nicely derived the name of a Norse Goddess, 'Freya' and the old English word 'hop' meaning remote valley) from the and pass Trough House, leaving the moor behind and reach Glaisdale, perched above the Esk Valley.

4 hours walking. Highest point (Glaisdale High Moor): 400m (1,330ft)

Day 16 - Glaisdale to High Hawsker (14 miles / 23 km)
After a walk through East Arncliff Wood, you'll descent to the village of Egton Bridge, one of the prettiest on the Coast to Coast route, before continuing down the valley past the elegant Egton Manor into the one-street village of Grosmont. After the easy descents earlier in the day, there's a 15 mile stretch of ups and downs leading to the sea beginning with a 230m climb out of Grosmont to the top of Sleights Moor. You've just got another two moors to cross before the day ends at High Hawkser, tantalisingly close to the sea.

6 hours walking. Highest point (Sleights Moor): 400m (1,330ft)

Day 17 - High Hawsker to Robin Hood's Bay (5 miles / 8 km)
You'll soon reach the North Sea -and rejoin the Cleveland Way along the clifftops as you head into picturesque Robin Hood's Bay. If you've been carrying a pebble from St Bees, it's time to leave it on the opposite shore

2½ hours walking. Highest point: 120m (395ft)

Departure - Departure from Robins Hood's Bay after breakfast
Your holiday arrangements end after breakfast.

Notes

Please be aware that slight variations to these itineraries may have to be made due to availability of accommodation. Please note that the quoted daily mileage does not include distance from the path to your overnight accommodation.

Our prices are based on two persons sharing a room. If you are travelling with others and require your own room, the single price applies.

If you are walking the route by yourself, the Solo Traveller price applies If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

ACCOMMODATION ON THE ROUTE

Accommodation:

Depending on where you are on the trail you’re following, your overnight accommodation can vary from a B&B, guest house or hotel, which is all part of enjoying the countryside. Here are examples of the type of accommodation you can expect on The Coast to Coast Path. Wherever possible, we will reserve rooms with ensuite or private bathrooms. There may be locations or times of the year when accommodation with only shared facilities are available.

If you wish to add rest days into the itinerary please contact us for details.

How it works


Included in the holiday arrangements and package cost:

  • Accommodation in B&Bs, guest houses, inns and small hotels on, or close by, the route
  • Breakfast daily
  • Daily baggage transfer - one bag per person up to 20kg (44lbs)
  • If you are booked off route for the evening, we will provide any necessary transportation between the route and your accommodation and back to the path again the next morning
  • A detailed map and/or guidebook of the long distance path chosen per room
  • Support and planning in implementing your trip
  • Information pack with full contact and location details on your overnight accommodation and baggage transfer company
  • Assistance of a 24/7 Duty Officer who will do everything to help you in case of an emergency.

  • Not included in the holiday arrangements and package cost:

  • Transportation to the start of your holiday or from the final night’s accommodation
  • Any parking costs for the duration of your holiday
  • Travel insurance
  • Lunches or dinners (or any travel costs in getting to nearby pubs or restaurants)

  • Arrival and Departure:

    Return transport back to your car at the end of the holiday is not included, however is often available by public transport or taxi.

    There is a railway station in St Bees linked with London Euston. The journey however, takes very long so you may prefer to travel from London Euston to Carlise and change there for St Bees. Please note that no trains run though St. Bees on Sundays. The nearest railway stations to Robin Hood’s Bay are in Whitby or Scarborough. Rail timetables, fare and route information can be found at www.nationalrail.co.uk or by calling National Rail Enquiries on 03457 484 950.

    Coach travel information is available at www.nationalexpress.com or by calling National Express on 0871 781 8181

    Route Planning: The Traveline and Rome2Rio both offer free and detailed online route planning facilities on their websites which may help you find your way to and from your holiday location. Details can be found at: www.traveline.info and www.rome2rio.com


    Rest Days and Extra Nights:

    If you wish to add rest days into your itinerary or add extra nights, please contact us.


    'Accommodation Only' package:

    Some walkers travel very light or want to carry all their belongings with them. We understand that, so why not choose our 'accommodation only' package. We will book your overnight stays in an eclectic mix of accommodations along the route and provide you with location maps for each property, so you won't struggle to find it at the end of a walking day. Please contact us for details.

    "I just thought I would thank you very much for your assistance with the hike. We thoroughly enjoyed it, and appreciated all your help." Robin B.

     

    "(...) we were pleased by the service and the standard of accommodation and the welcome we received. We very much enjoyed the walk and appreciated your arrangements on our behalf." Gordon C.

    "We would like to thank you for the lovely walking holiday you booked for us. We saw some lovely places and met some lovely people from all over the World." Alison D.

    "We completed the challenge (...) and enjoyed almost 15 days of good weather, waterproofs only required for four hours! Acommodation and baggage arrangements worked well and the maps, guide book and accommodation maps were excellent. Many thanks for making the arrangements on our behalf." Pauline G.

    "I have to say that we were extremely happy with the arrangements made and with all our accommodation. Our hosts were always friendly and helpful and most of them appeared to understand the needs of walkers. Where our stay served food it was really good so we had no complaints across the board. Thanks again for your assistance." Phil T.

    "We all had a very good week doing the first part of the C2C. All of the arrangements that you made on our behalf worked seamlessly, baggage transfers and person transfer at the start of the week went without a hitch. All of the information that you provided, i.e. guide books, maps and the notes and detailed itinerary were very good and easy to follow. While we had other maps, GPS etc the information that you provided I feel would have been sufficient to enable us to complete the walk. I have to say a big thanks to yourself for answering all my queries prior to our departure." Angela A.

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